Estimates suggest there can be up to 100 times more enzymes in sprouts, sprouted beans, than in fruit and vegetables, depending on the particular type of enzyme and the variety of seed being sprouted

ORGANIC SHOPS
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Our Customers are :
GARDEN CENTERS
HEALTH SHOPS
DELICATESSEN
BAKERIES
CATERERS H & R
       
If your profile matches the above we would be very delighted to supply you with our range of Organic Products

(Our Customers are not : SUPERMARKETS or C&C !)


FOOD ETHICS

Soil

  • 1.What Organic Agriculture does: Organic agriculture maintains soil fertility through the use of crop rotations, cover crops, and natural fertilizers like compost and manure. Organic producers reduce tillage to minimize soil erosion on the land.
  • 2.What Organic Agriculture does not do: Organic agriculture does not use synthetic fertilizers. To produce synthetic fertilizers, intensive use of fossil fuel energy is required. Synthetic fertilizers, because they are produced in factories, are often transported over long distances, again requiring the use of fossil fuels. Organic agriculture also does not use sewage sludge as a fertilizer. Sewage sludge can be contaminated with heavy minerals, dioxins and other chemicals.


Water
  • 1.What Organic Agriculture does: Organic producers manage the soil’s fertility in a way that reduces water pollution. Since they control pests by rotating crops and encourage biodiversity in the fields, they reduce pesticide pollution in groundwater and drinking water.
  • 2.What Organic Agriculture does not do: Synthetic fertilizers in conventional agriculture are often applied in a way that leads to nutrient leaching. This contaminates the water, which can be harmful to humans who drink it. Fertilizers also increase algal growth, leading to oxygen depletion in bodies of water, like the Dead Zone in the Gulf of Mexico. Moreover, the leaching of sewage sludge and pesticides from conventional fields leads to water pollution.

Plant Breeding

  • 1.What Organic Agriculture does: Organic agriculture values varieties of plants and animals that are bred for taste, not for resisting mechanical picking, withstanding long periods of storage or surviving rough handling in transportation.
  • 2.What Organic Agriculture does not do: Most genetically engineered crops grown in the United States have been bred to tolerate herbicides or emit pesticides. Organic agriculture does not use genetically engineered crops.

Pest Management

  • 1.What Organic Agriculture does: Organic producers promote biological diversity in the field to prevent pest damage. By rotating crops and encouraging plant diversity in the field, pest insects are much less likely to thrive. Organic farmers welcome beneficial insects, like ladybugs, that prey on the insects that damage crops. A diversity of soil organisms also helps to control pests. When prevention fails, organic farmers use a variety of strategies, like encouraging beneficial insects to prey on the pest insect, disrupting the mating behavior of the pest insects, and traps and barriers. As a last resort, organic growers are allowed to apply certain non-synthetic pesticides.
  • 2.What Organic Agriculture does not do: Conventional agriculture, with its focus on monoculture cropping, encourages the abundance of insects that thrive on the monocultured crop. Conventional farmers then rely more heavily on synthetic and toxic pesticides to control these pests.

Weed Control

  • 1.What Organic Agriculture does: Organic farmers prevent weed infestations through crop rotation, and control weeds by using mechanical tillage, hand-weeding, cover crops, mulches, flame weeding and other management methods.
  • 2.What Organic Agriculture does not do: Unlike conventional farmers, organic farmers do not use synthetic herbicides, which can be toxic to mammals (including humans) and birds.

Humane Animal Treatment

  • 1.What Organic Agriculture does: Organic standards require access to outdoor pasture for ruminants like cows. When not confined in stressful conditions, animals are healthier and are much less dependent on antibiotics for disease control.
  • 2.What Organic Agriculture does not do: Conventional livestock production is relying more and more heavily on crowded, confined and unsanitary “confined animal feeding operations” (CAFO’s). Animals are often kept in iron crates where they are confined for weeks or months, unable to turn around, stretch their legs, or act out their natural behavior.

No Antibiotics

  • 1.What Organic Agriculture does: Organic livestock producers manage their animals’ health through preventative measures like good nutrition, adequate exercise, sanitary housing, and the reduction of stress.
  • 2.What Organic Agriculture does not do: Organic producers must use antibiotics to treat sick animals, but these animals must be removed from the herd and cannot be sold as organic. Conventional livestock producers routinely administer low doses of antibiotics to their entire herd or flock to prevent disease and promote growth. Overuse of antibiotics can lead to antibiotic resistance of the harmful bacteria, which can be transmitted to humans.

No Growth Hormones

  • 1.What Organic Agriculture does: Organic livestock producers encourage animal growth and dairy production through good nutrition.
  • 2.What Organic Agriculture does not do: Animals raised under organic standards may not be given hormones to promote growth or milk production. The genetically engineered growth hormone rBST (or rBGH) is used by some conventional dairy farmers to increase milk production, but this can lead to increase incidences of udder infections (mastitis) in cows. Scientific studies to determine long-term effects of consuming milk produced with rBST have not been conducted.


Livestock Feeding
  • 1.What Organic Agriculture does: Organic livestock producers must provide 100% organic feed to the animals. Since most corn and soybeans grown in the United States are used as animal feed, this means that organic livestock production supports organic crop production.
  • 2.What Organic Agriculture does not do: Conventional livestock producers feed their animals corn and soybeans that have been grown with the use of genetically engineered seed, synthetic fertilizers, pesticides, etc. While conventional livestock feed is unlikely to have a big impact on the quality of the meat, eggs, or milk, it does contribute to the negative environmental impacts that organic agriculture seeks to avoid.